Early Christian thought and the classical tradition; studies in Justin, Clement, and Origen.
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Early Christian thought and the classical tradition; studies in Justin, Clement, and Origen. by Chadwick, Henry

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Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Clement, of Alexandria, Saint, ca. 150-ca. 215,
  • Justin, Martyr, Saint,
  • Origen

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsBR67 .C43 1966
The Physical Object
Pagination174 p.
Number of Pages174
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5985295M
LC Control Number66015011
OCLC/WorldCa387187

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  I bought this little paper back book in for about 14 dollars. I think $55 is a little steep for this brief series of lectures on the influence of Greek and Platonic thought on three early Apologists of the Catholic faith, Justin Martyr, Origen and by: This enlightening study examines the relationship of the early Christians to the classical tradition. Based on the work of the Christian thinkers, Justine, Clement of Alexandria, and Origen, and existing pagan criticism of the Church, the book illustrates how rejection of the classical tradition combined with profound acceptance of its humanism were synthesized by the early Church. The historian of Western culture cannot travel far without discovering that the roots of many 20th-century questions lie in the ancient dialogue between the early Christians and culture of the old Classical world. This book takes three Christian thinkers: Justin, Clement of Alexandria, and Origen, and shows what the debate looked like from the Christian : Henry Chadwick. Get this from a library! Early Christian thought and the classical tradition: studies in Justin, Clement, and Origen. [Henry Chadwick] -- "The historian of Western culture cannot travel far without discovering that the roots of many twentieth-century questions lie in in the ancient dialogue between the early Christians and the culture.

The historian of western culture cannot travel far without discovering that the roots of many twentieth-century questions lie in the ancient dialogue between the early Christians and culture of the old classical world. This book takes three Christian thinkers: Justin, clement of Alexandria,and Origen, and shows what the debate looked like from the Christian side/5(2).   For Greeks and Romans, Christianity is irrational because it never corresponds with their philosophy. Despite of downplaying, Christian doctrines have spread out all over the known worlds. It also produces great Christian thinkers and defenders of Christian faith, like Justin Martyr, Origen, Augustine, and Clement of Alexandria. Justin earned his surname when he perished during the persecution of Christians by Marcus Aurelius () in about AD Most scholars agree that Justin was verbose, confused, inconsistent and often not convincing in his arguments. Nevertheless, he is an important figure in the history of the Church.   H. Chadwick, Early Christian Thought and Classical Tradition () H. Chadwick, “Justin Martyr’s Defense of Christianity,” Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 47 (): F. H. Colson, “Notes on Justin Martyr, Apology,” Journal of Theological Studies 23 ():

Product Information. This enlightening study examines the relationship of the early Christians to the classical tradition. Based on the work of the Christian thinkers, Justine, Clement of Alexandria, and Origen, and existing pagan criticism of the Church, the book illustrates how rejection of the classical tradition combined with profound acceptance of its humanism were synthesized by the. Early Christian Thought and the Classical Tradition: Studies in Justin, Clement, and Origen By Henry Chadwick Oxford University Press, Read preview Overview The Commentaries of Origen and Jerome on St. Paul's Epistle to the Ephesians By Ronald E. Heine Oxford University Press, This book discusses the occurrence of angelic imagery in early Christian discourse about the Holy Spirit. Taking as its entry-point Clement of Alexandria’s less explored writings, Excerpta ex Theodoto, Eclogae propheticae, and Adumbrationes, it shows that Clement’s angelomorphic pneumatology occurs in tandem with spirit christology, within a theological framework still characterized by a. This enlightening study examines the relationship of the early Christians to the classical tradition. Based on the work of the Christian thinkers, Justine, Clement of Alexandria, and Origen, and existing pagan criticism of the Church, the book illustrates how rejection of the classical tradition combined with profound acceptance of its humanism were synthesized by the earl4/5.